Inner Voice

Getting on better terms with your inner voice

April 12, 2019

We’ve all got that inner voice that like it or not, gives us feedback on much of what we do or say. It is just like having a personal coach or mentor.

It can be an encouraging voice “good work”, “nice shot” these are the comments that build us up from the inside.

Sometimes its a voice that shares the fun with us about the outside world. “I can’t believe what just happened, how lucky was that! I got away with that, no one will know!’’

What is not so funny is when the inner voice turns bad. “What an idiot I was, no one has ever done such a bad job”.

Or worse “if you don’t do this job well or get full marks in that exam everyone will feel so let down”.

It isn’t hard to find that voice urging us not to even try.

“Don’t start writing that report for work. It will be too hard for you, you’ll mess it up and everyone will know what a fraud you are”.

So the inner voice can voice any self-doubts and magnify them in our minds. This of course is driving lots of our personal agony. Procrastinating or avoiding trying new things because of a fear of basically messing up.

Why do we give our inner voice so much credibility?

Well basically because it is part of our self protective mechanism. It will boost ourselves at times with positives. However, it can also voice fears we have. When this happens it can unhelpfully direct us towards avoiding the situation. Becoming avoidant in the short term is comforting and safe for a short while.

In this way it is very different to how other parts of our personality interpret the world. Our more rational self might want to confront the issue, understand it better and develop a logical approach to mastering the situation.

If you find your inner critical voice is too loud it can help to share those concerns with others. It is a natural part of the human condition and usually you will find others have those self doubts too.

You might also wonder if your inner critic is causing you to favour particular behaviour – becoming avoidant or even a bit addicted to some activities at the expense of others.

It can be really useful to take time to discuss this with a psychologist to see if re-adjusting your inner perspective might be just the edge you need to get going again. Contact us here to arrange an appointment today.

Cate Cheetham

Clinical Psychologist and Neuropsychologist.


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